P. 385 (with art)

Once in Breslau (now Wroclaw), now lost: Early Corinthian aryballos with Herakles and Hydra

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Drawing of Herakles and Hydra from H. Payne, Necrocorinthia: A Study of Corinthian Art in the Archaic Period (1931), p. 127 fig. 45A

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Drawing of aryballos with Herakles and Hydra from H. Payne, Necrocorinthia: A Study of Corinthian Art in the Archaic Period (1931), p. 287 fig. 123 bis

Jena, University 137: Middle Corinthian cup with Herakles and Hydra

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Drawings from H. Payne, Necrocorinthia: A Study of Corinthian Art in the Archaic Period (1931), p. 127 fig. 45B

Basel, Antikenmuseum BS 425: Middle Corinthian aryballos with Herakles and Hydra

iconiclimc (main characters)

iconiclimc (Athena)

iconiclimc (chariot)

From Argos, now lost: Middle Corinthian kotyle with Herakles and Hydra

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Drawings from H. Payne, Necrocorinthia: A Study of Corinthian Art in the Archaic Period (1931), p. 127 fig. 45C

Paris, Louvre CA 3004: Middle Corinthian skyphos with Herakles and Hydra

Louvre

Louvre (detail of Herakles and Hydra)

Chest of Kypselos from temple of Hera at Olympia (known through Pausanias’ description and modern reconstructions)

Pausanias Description of Greece 5.17.11:

Iolaus, who voluntarily helped Heracles in his labours, is shown as a victor in the chariot-race [or as Heracles’ helper]. At this point the funeral games of Pelias come to an end, and Heracles, with Athena standing beside him, is shooting at the hydra, the beast in the river Amymone. Heracles can be easily recognized by his exploit and his attitude, so his name is not inscribed by him (original Greek).

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Detail with Herakles and Hydra, from reconstruction of chest of Kypselos by W. von Massow, “Die Kypseloslade,” Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung vol. 41 (1916), 1 ff., pl. 10.

Throne of Apollo at Amyklai (known through Pausanias’ description and modern reconstructions)

Pausanias Description of Greece 3.18.13:

Next to these have been wrought two of the exploits of Heracles—his slaying the hydra, and his bringing up the Hound of Hell (original Greek).

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Reconstruction of whole throne by A. Furtwängler, from J.G. Frazer, Pausanias’s Description of Greece, vol. III, Commentary (2nd ed. 1913), p. 352

Athens, Acropolis Museum: limestone pediment (gable) with Herakles and Hydra

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Acropolis Museum

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flickr photo by Jason Brooks

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Detail of Iolaos in flickr photo by Jason Brooks

Perseus Art & Archaeology Artifact Browser

Once Berlin F1801, now lost: Attic black-figure Little Master cup with Herakles and Hydra

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E. Pfuhl, Malerei und Zeichnung der Griechen vol. 3 (1923) pl. 64 fig. 250

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Rome, Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia 74989: Attic black-figure Tyrrhenian amphora with Herakles and Hydra?

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Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Malibu, J. Paul Getty Museum 83.AE.346: Caeretan hydria with Herakles and Hydra

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Getty Museum

Paris, Louvre CA 598: Attic black-figure white-ground lekythos with Herakles and Hydra

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G. Perrot and C. Chipiez, Histoire de l’art dans l’antiquité vol. 10: La Grèce archaïque, la céramique d’Athènes (1914), p. 690 fig. 376

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Collection of Shelby White and Leon Levy: Attic red-figure with Herakles, Hydra and Iolaos

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Artful Adventures: Ancient Greece, An interactive guide for families (Princeton University Art Museum)

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