P. 299

ApB (Apollodoros, Bibliotheke [Library]) 2.2.1:

Lynceus reigned over Argos after Danaus and begat a son Abas by Hypermnestra; and Abas had twin sons Acrisius and Proetus by Aglaia, daughter of Mantineus (original Greek).

Pho (Scholia for Euripides, Phoinissai [Phoenician Women]) 180 (Scholia in Euripidem, ed. E. Schwartz, vol. 1 [1887], p. 274)

Hes fr 129 MW (R. Merkelbach and M.L. West, Fragmenta Hesiodea [1967], pp. 62-63):

. . . gave . . . [paid ba]ck a great harm. . . . then b[ore blam]eless Abas . . . in the lofty palace . . . [who] rivaled [the Oly]mpians [in sightliness;] . . . [fa]ther of men and gods . . . and to mount the same bed; [and she bore Proitos] and Akrisios the king (translation by Silvio Curtis).

Bak (Bakchylides) 11.40, 64-69:

To her once the son of Abas… an insurmountable quarrel had arisen, from a slight beginning, between the brothers Proetus and Acrisius. They were destroying their people with lawless feuding and grievous battles, and the people entreated the sons of Abas… (original Greek).

Il (Homer, Iliad) 14. 319-320:

…nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius, who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors (original Greek).

Bak (Bakchylides) 11.59-72:

For it was now the tenth year since the heroes with their bronze shields, fearless in battle, had left Argos, the city loved by the gods, and lived in Tiryns with their much envied king, because an insurmountable quarrel had arisen, from a slight beginning, between the brothers Proetus and Acrisius. They were destroying their people with lawless feuding and grievous battles, and the people entreated the sons of Abas that, since they had as their share a land rich in barley, the younger one should be the founder of  Tiryns, before they fell under ruinous compulsion (original Greek).

ApB (Apollodoros, Bibliotheke [Library]) 2.2.1:

Lynceus reigned over Argos after Danaus and begat a son Abas by Hypermnestra; and Abas had twin sons Acrisius and Proetus by Aglaia, daughter of Mantineus. These two quarrelled with each other while they were still in the womb, and when they were grown up they waged war for the kingdom, and in the course of the war they were the first to invent shields. And Acrisius gained the mastery and drove Proetus from Argos; and Proetus went to Lycia to the court of Iobates or, as some say, of Amphianax, and married his daughter, whom Homer calls Antia, but the tragic poets call her Stheneboea. His in-law restored him to his own land with an army of Lycians, and he occupied Tiryns, which the Cyclopes had fortified for him. They divided the whole of the Argive territory between them and settled in it, Acrisius reigning over Argos and Proetus over Tiryns (original Greek).

Edited by Frances Van Keuren, Prof. Emerita, Lamar Dodd School of Art, Univ. of Georgia

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