P. 287

Pausanias Description of Greece 10.29.3:

Tityos too is in the picture; he is no longer being punished, but has been reduced to nothing by continuous torture, an indistinct and mutilated phantom. Going on to the next part of the picture, you see very near to the man who is twisting the rope a painting of Ariadne. Seated on a rock she is looking at her sister Phaedra, who is on a swing grasping in either hand the rope on each side. The attitude, though quite gracefully drawn, makes us infer the manner of Phaedra’s death (original Greek).

Sophocles, fr. 686 R (Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. S. Radt [1971], p. 479):

Speaker 1: Then you were alive? You didn’t die and live below the earth?

Speaker 2: No, for chance is overpowered by fate. (translated by Aaron J. Ivey)

Sophocles, fr. 687 R (Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. S. Radt [1971], p. 479):

…he wagged his tail at me, letting his ears drop down… (translated by Aaron J. Ivey)

Sophocles, fr. 680 R  (Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. S. Radt [1971], p. 477):

…no mortal, ladies, could ever escape shame by which Zeus stirred up wicked things. Necessity […] to bear god-driven diseases… (translated by Aaron J. Ivey)

Sophocles, fr. 684 R  (Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. S. Radt [1971], p. 478):

For desire comes not upon men alone, or even women, but it also stirs up the spirits of the gods and goes upon the sea. Not even all-powerful Zeus has the strength to ward it off but yields and willingly gives way [to it]… (translated by Aaron J. Ivey)

Edited by Aaron J. Ivey, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Department of Classics, University of Georgia, June 2016.

 

 

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