P. 279 (with art)

Pindar, fr. 166 SM (Pindari Carmina Cum Fragmentis, ed. Bruno Snell [1964], p. 121):

When the Centaurs knew the man-taming smell of honey-sweet wine, they impetuously hurled the white milk from the tables and, drinking of their own freewill from silver horns, they were becoming drunk…(translated by Aaron J. Ivey).

Florence, Museo Archeologico Nazionale 81268 (3997): Attic red-figure column krater with wedding of Peirithoos:

Florence81268GriechVasenmPl166

A. Furtwaengler and K. Reichhold, Griechische Vasenmalerei: Auswahl hervorragender Vasenbilder (Serie III, Tafel 121-180, 1932), pl. 166.2

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

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Berlin, Antikensammlung F2403: Attic red-figure volute krater fragments with wedding of Peirithoos

BerlinF2403GriechVasemFig88P247

A. Furtwaengler and K. Reichhold, Griechische Vasenmalerei: Auswahl hervorragender Vasenbilder (Serie II, Text, 1909), p. 247, fig. 88

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art 07. 286.84: Attic red-figure volute krater with wedding of Peirithoos on neck of side A

NYMetMus07.286.84DetNeckA

metmusvolutekratercentaurom

Metropolitan Museum

FRpl#116MetVoluteKraterCentaurom

A. Furtwaengler, Adolf and K. Reichhold, Griechische Vasenmalerei: Auswahl hervorragender Vasenbilder (Serie II, 1909), pl. 116

Perseus Art & Archaeology Artifact Browser

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

iconiclimc

Olympia, Archaeological Museum: marble figures from the west pediment of temple of Zeus, Olympia, depicting the wedding of Peirithoos

OlympiaWPedLFigsLatsisCatPp222-223.jpg

OlympiaWPedRFigsLatsisCatPp240-241

Illustrations pp. 222-3 and 240-1 from G.E. Hatzi, The Archaeological Museum of Olympia (2008)

OlympiaWPedWeege#1

OlympiaWPedWeege#2

OlympiaWPedWeege#3

Reconstruction of west pediment by F. Weege, from W. Dörpfeld, Alt-Olympia (1935), vol. 2, pl. 24

Perseus Art & Archaeology Artifact Browser

Reconstruction of west pediment with views of sculptures, from Michael Lahanas’ page, Apollo in the Zeus Temple in Olympia

Reconstruction of west pediment at Classical Art Research Centre, University of Oxford

OlympiaWPedTheseusGp

Sculptural group believed to represent Theseus, originally with axe (see Pausanias 5.10.8 below), a Centaur and a Lapith woman; photo pp. 242-3 from G.E. Hatzi, The Archaeological Museum of Olympia (2008)

Perseus Art & Archaeology Artifact Browser

Pausanias Description of Greece 1.17.2:

Hard by the gymnasium [in Athens] is a sanctuary of Theseus, where are pictures of Athenians fighting Amazons. This war they have also represented on the shield of their Athena and upon the pedestal of the Olympian Zeus. In the sanctuary of Theseus is also a painting of the battle between the Centaurs and the Lapithae. Theseus has already killed a Centaur, but elsewhere the fighting is still undecided (original Greek).

Pausanias Description of Greece 5.10.8:

The sculptures in the front pediment [of the temple of Zeus at Olympia] are by Paeonius, who came from Mende in Thrace; those in the back pediment are by Alcamenes, a contemporary of Pheidias, ranking next after him for skill as a sculptor. What he carved on the pediment [see the reconstruction above] is the fight between the Lapithae and the Centaurs at the marriage of Peirithous. In the center of the pediment is Peirithous. On one side of him is Eurytion, who has seized the wife of Peirithous, with Caeneus bringing help to Peirithous, and on the other side is Theseus defending himself against the Centaurs with an axe. One Centaur has seized a maid, another a boy in the prime of youth. Alcamenes, I think, carved this scene, because he had learned from Homer’s poem that Peirithous was a son of Zeus, and because he knew that Theseus was a great grandson of Pelops (original Greek).

London, British Museum and Athens, Acropolis Museum: metopes from south exterior frieze of Parthenon on Athenian Acropolis, depicting the wedding of Peirithoos

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South side of Parthenon, where metopes were located when Jacques Carrey drew them in 1674 (see below)

CarreyDwgsSMetopesParthenon1-8

CarreyDwgsSMetopesParthenon9-16

CarreyDwgsSMetopesParthenon17-24

CarreyDwgsSMetopesParthenon25-32

Drawings of all south metopes, made by Jacques Carrey in 1674, before their removal from Parthenon (from Solving Light Books)

Athens, Acropolis Museum (Google Arts & Culture)

Perseus Art & Archaeology Artifact Browser

Metopes at British Museum and drawings of them

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South metope 27, British Museum, believed by some scholars to depict Theseus battling a Centaur

Perseus Art & Archaeology Artifact Browser

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Colored cast of south metope 30, British Museum

Edited by Aaron J. Ivey, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Department of Classics, University of Georgia, June 2016; and by Frances Van Keuren, Prof. Emerita, Lamar Dodd School of Art, Univ. of Georgia, July 2016.

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