P. 310 upper (with art)

Rome, Villa Giulia XXXXO.5408 (cited as “VG no #”): Attic red-figure pelike with Perseus displaying Medusa’s head to seated and standing men, possibly including Polydektes

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum online (go to Rome, Museo Nazionale di Villa Giulia iv, pp. 30-32 and pls. 2894-2895)

Bologna, Museo Civico 325: Attic red-figure bell krater with Perseus and Polydektes

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Pherekydes of Athens 3F11 (Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. [1957], pp. 61-62):

But Athena takes the head from Perseus and sets it in her aegis. And he gives the pouch away to Hermes, and the sandals and the cap; and Hermes gives them back to the nymphs (translation by Silvio Curtis).

Pherekydes of Athens 3F12 (Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. [1957], p. ):

Perseus leaves Diktys behind in Seriphos to be king of the Seriphians who were left, but he himself went by boat to Argos with the Kyklopes and Danae and Andromeda (translation by Silvio Curtis).

Bak (Bakchylides) 11.77-81:

And the mighty Cyclopes came, and toiled to build a most beautiful wall for the glorious city [Tiryns], where the godlike [80] far-famed heroes lived when they had left behind horse-pasturing Argos (original Greek).

Paus (Pausanias) 2.16.5:

There still remain, however, parts of the city wall [at Mycenae], including the gate, upon which stand lions. These, too, are said to be the work of the Cyclopes, who made for Proetus the wall at Tiryns (original Greek).

 

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