P. 258

Hyginus Fabula 198:

Nisus, son of Mars, or as others say, of Deion, and king of the Megarians, is said to have had a purple lock of hair on his head. An oracle had told him that he would rule as long as he preserved that lock. When Minos, son of Jove, had come to attack him, Scylla, daughter of Nisus, fell in love with him at the instigation of Venus. To make him the victor, she cut the fatal lock from her sleeping father, and so Nisus was conquered by Minos. He said that holy Crete would not receive such a criminal. She threw herself into the sea to avoid pursuit [?]. Nisus, however, in pursuit of his daughter, was changed into a halliaetos, that is, a sea-eagle. Scylla, his daughter, was changed into a fish which they call the ciris, and today, if ever that bird sees the fish swimming, he dives into the water, seizes it, and rends it with his claws (original Latin).

Ovid Ars Amatoria 1.331-32:

The Daughter (Scylla), having stolen the purple hair from Nisus, burdens the rabid dogs with her groin and loins (translated by Aaron J. Ivey).

Vergil Eclogues 6.74-77:

Wherefore speak
of Scylla, child of Nisus, who, ’tis said,
her fair white loins with barking monsters girt
vexed the Dulichian ships, and, in the deep
swift-eddying whirlpool, with her sea-dogs tore
the trembling mariners? (original Latin).

Vergil Ciris 54-91:

 

Edited by Aaron J. Ivey, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Department of Classics, University of Georgia, March 2016; Dan Mills, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Department of Classics, University of Georgia, March 2017.

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