P. 312 (with art)

Cited in note 25 for p. 312: Scholia for Homer, Odyssey 11.326 (Scholia Graeca in Homeris Odysseam, ed. W. Dindorf, vol. 2 [1855], pp. 507-508

Melampodia (see R. Merkelbach and M.L. West, Fragmenta Hesiodea [1967], frs 270-279, pp. 133-138)

Hes fr 129 MW (R. Merkelbach and M.L. West, Fragmenta Hesiodea [1967], pp. 62-63 )

Cited in note 26 for p. 312: Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library) 2.2.2:

Proetus had daughters, Lysippe, Iphinoe, and Iphianassa, by Stheneboea. When these damsels were grown up, they went mad, according to Hesiod, because they would not accept the rites of Dionysus, but according to Acusilaus, because they disparaged the wooden image of Hera (original Greek).

Pherekydes of Athens 3F114 (Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. [1957], pp. 90-91)

Hes fr 130 MW (R. Merkelbach and M.L. West, Fragmenta Hesiodea [1967], p. 64)

Hes fr 131 MW (R. Merkelbach and M.L. West, Fragmenta Hesiodea [1967], p. 64)

Akousilaos 2F28 (Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. [1957], p. 55)

Bakchylides 11.47-52:

For, while still virgins, they [daughters of Proetus] entered the sanctuary of the purple-belted goddess, [50] and said that their father far surpassed in wealth the golden-haired consort of holy, widely powerful Zeus (original Greek).

Hes fr 132 MW (R. Merkelbach and M.L. West, Fragmenta Hesiodea [1967], pp. 64-65)

Homer, Iliad 24.30:

and [Paris] gave precedence to her [Aphrodite] who furthered his fatal lustfulness (original Greek).

Athens, National Museum 13413: painted metope from Thermon with Proitides (daughters of Proitos)

antdenkmvol21908pl52a5

Deutsches Archäologisches Institut. Antike Denkmäler, vol. 2 (1908), pl. 52A.5

iconiclimc image

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art 17.190.73: ivory plaque with Proitides (daughters of Proitos)

daughtersproitosmetmus

Metropolitan Museum

Hes fr 133 MW (R. Merkelbach and M.L. West, Fragmenta Hesiodea [1967], p. 65)

Bakchylides 11.53-58, 92-95:

In anger at them, she [Hera] put a twisted thought into their minds, [55] and they fled to the wooded mountain with terrible screams, leaving behind the city of Tiryns and its god-built streets… For thirteen whole months his daughters roamed wildly through the shadowy forests and fled through sheep-nurturing Arcadia [95] (original Greek).

Vergil, Eclogues 6.48-51:

the daughters too of Proetus filled the fields
with their feigned lowings, yet no one of them
of such unhallowed union e’er was fain
as with a beast to mate, though many a time
on her smooth forehead she had sought for horns,
and for her neck had feared the galling plough (original Latin).

Probus, In Vergilii Bucolica et Georgica Commentarius (1848), p. 22 line 18.

Aelianus, VH (Varia Historia) 3.42:

Elege and Celane were Daughters of Prœtus. The Queen of Cyprus work’d them to prostitute themselves, insomuch as in some parts of Peloponnesus they ran up and down, as it is said, naked and raging  (original Greek).

Hes fr 37 MW (R. Merkelbach and M.L. West, Fragmenta Hesiodea [1967], pp. 25-26)

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