P. 315

Euripides, Stheneboia, pp. 567-68 N2 (Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. A. Nauck [2nd ed. 1889])

Euripides, Bellerophontes fr 286 N2 (Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. A. Nauck [2nd ed 1889], p. 445)

Euripides, Bellerophontes fr 309 N2 (Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. A. Nauck [2nd ed 1889], pp. 451-2)

Mor (Plutarch, Moralia) 807e = Precepts of Statecraft (Precepta gerendae reipublicae):

Agesilaüs, too, showed himself very weak and poor-spirited in dealing with his friends’ solicitations and, like Pegasus in Euripides’ drama,

Crouched down and yielded more if more he wished (original Greek).

Euripides, Bellerophontes fr 311 N2 (Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. A. Nauck [2nd ed 1889], p. 452)

NA (Aelianus, De Natura Animalium) 5.34 (Aelian, On the Characteristics of Animals, trans. A.F. Scholfield, vol. 1 [1959], pp. 326-327):

Now the Swan has so contented a spirit that at the very close of its life it sings and breaks out into a dirge, as it were, for itself. Even so does Euripides [fr. 311 N] sing of Bellerophon, prepared like a hero of high soul for death. For example, he has portrayed him addressing his soul thus:

‘Reverent wast thou ever in life towards the gods; strangers didst thou succour; nor didst thou ever grow weary towards thy friends’ (original Greek).

Euripides, Bellerophontes fr 312 N2 (Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. A. Nauck [2nd ed 1889], p. 452)

Asklepiades 12F13 (Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. [1957], pp. 170-171)

Ol (Scholia for Pindar, Olympian) 13.130c (Scholia vetera in Pindari carmina, ed. A.B. Drachmann, vol. 1 [1903], p. 382)

∑ Lyk (Scholia for Lykophron, Alexandra) 17 (Lycophronis Alexandra, ed. E. Scheer, vol. 2 Scholia continens [1908], pp. 15-19)

Batr (Scholia for Aristophanes, Batrachoi [Ranae, Frogs]) 1043 (Scholia Graeca in Aristophanem, ed. F. Dübner [1877], p. 304)

Batr (Scholia for Aristophanes, Batrachoi [Ranae, Frogs]) 1051 (Scholia Graeca in Aristophanem, ed. F. Dübner [1877], p. 304)

Fab (Hyginus, Fabulae) 57:

But the king [Iobates], praising his valor, gave him his other daughter in marriage, and Stheneboea, hearing of it, killed herself (original Latin).

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